Daily Invest Pro

  /  News   /  As big cats go hungry, Indonesia zoo considers ‘worst-case’ deer cull

As big cats go hungry, Indonesia zoo considers ‘worst-case’ deer cull

imageWorld5 hours ago (May 22, 2020 04:01AM ET)

6/6

(C) Reuters. Workers carry fruits and vegetables for animals before distributing the food at the zoo, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak in Bandung

2/6

By Wahyuwidi Cinthya and Johan Purnomo

BANDUNG, Indonesia (Reuters) – A zoo in Indonesia may slaughter some of its animals to feed others, such as a Sumatran tiger and a Javan leopard, if it runs out of food in coming months after the coronavirus pandemic forced it to shut its doors.

While its 850 animals are being fed smaller portions than usual, the zoo is contemplating a “worst-case scenario” of culling some animals to feed others as it expects to run out of food in July.

The Badung zoo in Indonesia’s fourth-biggest city, which usually earns about 1.2 billion rupiah ($81,744) a month from visitors, shut on March 23 as part of a wider country lockdown to try to contain the outbreak.

“We have around thirty dotted deer, and we have identified the old and unproductive ones (who can no longer breed) to be slaughtered to save the carnivores, such as the Sumatran tiger and Javan leopard,” said zoo spokesman Sulhan Syafi’i.

Some birds including geese may also be culled, he said.

Big cats, including a critically endangered Sumatran tiger named Fitri, now get 8 kg (18 lb) of meat every two days, down from 10 kg previously.

The zoo needs more than 400 kg of fruit per day and 120 kg of meat every other day, Syafi’i said, noting it is now relying on donations to keep its animals alive.

“The crocodiles are fatter and the tigers are healthier too. But the lion is still a bit skinny,” said Fauzan Dzulfikar, who was allowed to visit after a donation.

The smaller daily portions have not gone unnoticed by the animals, even though Syafi’i said they still met minimum animal welfare standards.

Orangutan keeper Aep Saepudin said the endangered primates can go into a rage and throw things.

“The food is finished, but they still want to eat,” said Saepudin.

The Indonesia Zoo Association, which has requested help from President Joko Widodo, estimates 92 percent of the country’s 60 zoos can only feed their animals until the end of May.

As big cats go hungry, Indonesia zoo considers ‘worst-case’ deer cull

Disclaimer: Fusion Media would like to remind you that the data contained in this website is not necessarily real-time nor accurate. All CFDs (stocks, indexes, futures) and Forex prices are not provided by exchanges but rather by market makers, and so prices may not be accurate and may differ from the actual market price, meaning prices are indicative and not appropriate for trading purposes. Therefore Fusion Media doesn`t bear any responsibility for any trading losses you might incur as a result of using this data.

Fusion Media or anyone involved with Fusion Media will not accept any liability for loss or damage as a result of reliance on the information including data, quotes, charts and buy/sell signals contained within this website. Please be fully informed regarding the risks and costs associated with trading the financial markets, it is one of the riskiest investment forms possible.